Homecare

Who we are…
SEIU Local 503 represents more than 20,000 homecare workers in the state of Oregon. Close to 12,500 workers care for seniors and people with physical disabilities, and 7,500 care for people with developmental disabilities, mental health needs and medically fragile children.


You know you’re an Oregon care provider when…

10 Things You’ll Only Understand as a Homecare Worker

1. You know that homecare work is one of the hardest jobs in the world

 

At least astronauts get to sit down!

2. And it’s like you’re always on call

There’s no 9-5 for you…

3. It’s hard to describe what you do to other people

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I’m just trying to give people a way to live with dignity! What’s so hard to understand?

4. You stay calm under pressure.

5. Even if sometimes it feels like your job is MAID.

Dude…

6. And despite your dedication, it can be hard. And lonely.

Your friends talk about hanging out with co-workers,
and you’re like: What are co-workers?

7. But you know you’re making a difference and providing independence and self-sufficiency to those who need it.

WeMakeADifference

8. And you know things are getting better

Pay raises! More trainingHealth insurance!

9. And that SEIU has your back!

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SEIU 503 homecare workers in Oregon are now on a path to $15 by 2017, compared to the national average homecare wage of $9.00.

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10. And that by working together, homecare workers can continue to advocate for better funding, hours, and quality services for consumers while improving the lives of workers!

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SEIU knows homecare workers are some of the most hard-working, dedicated, and under-appreciated working professionals in Oregon.

Will you stand strong with your fellow homecare workers and join SEIU today?

Click here to join SEIU 503!

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Homecare Professional Development Certification (PDC)

Article 14, Section 5 in the new Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA), includes a training certification differential for homecare workers and personal support workers.

What is the purpose of the Professional Development Certification (PDC)? The purpose is to acknowledge the continued skill development and services provided by the HCW or PSW.

Is there a financial benefit for the HCW or PSW? Yes, once approved for the Professional Development Certification, the worker will earn a $.50 cent more per hour differential, above base rate pay. The certification period is 24 months, as long as all requirements are met and maintained. There will be a renewal process developed in the future, for those who are interested in renewing their certification.

What are some important dates that apply to the Professional Development Certification? Once all the requirements are met, the PSW or HCW may request a Professional Development Certification. The certification program is effective on January 1, 2017. The certification period is valid for 24 months.

Is there a funding cap? Yes. The Professional Development Certification Program’s continuation is subject to the availability of funds. If the number of homecare and personal support workers eligible for the differential exceeds more than 30% of the total number of workers the program will then be capped.  DHS/OHA/OHCC and SEIU are then required to meet and confer to keep the cost of the training differential within the available dedicated funds.

What are the requirements for the Professional Development Certification?

  • Have an active provider number.
  • Have a class attendance “no-show” rate of not more than 20%.
  • Have a current CPR/First Aid certification.
  • Pass each PDC class assessment with a score of 80% or higher for each PDC class.
  • Complete these required classes: Keeping It Professional, Working

Together, and Helping Caregivers Fight Fraud & Abuse.

  • Choose two of these four safety-type classes: Medication Safety, Protection against Sprains and Strains, Preventing Disease Transmission, or Taking Responsibility in Personal Safety.
  • Choose two of these four elective classes: of the following:

Challenging Behaviors (for HCWs), Everyone Communicates (for PSWs), Nutrition Basics, or Heart Healthy.

If I just took one of these classes a couple of months ago, can I just take the assessment and get credit? Yes, if you have taken any of the classes after October 29, 2015, you may request an assessment through and if you score at least 80%, you will get credit towards the required classes. There will be a one-time pro-rated stipend payment for the completion of each assessment. The assessment test and its implementation will be ready in August 2016 and not available at this time. Those who do not score high enough to get credit, will need to retake the class; no stipend will be available if class is taken within 12 months. You can request an assessment by sending an email to certifications.ohcc@state.or.us

How do I apply for the Professional Development Certification?

To apply for the Professional Development Certification, please mail the completed Professional Development Certification application and a copy of your CPR/First Aid cards showing current certification to:

Oregon Home Care Commission Roberta Lilly

Program Manager 676 Church Street NE Salem, Oregon 97301

Questions

If you have questions, please send an email to certifications.ohcc@state.or.us

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Homecare and Personal Support Worker overtime contract language

Following is the contract language negotiated by our homecare worker bargaining team with the State in 2016. The language was negotiated in a special bargaining session to meet new federal regulations that extended overtime protections to homecare and personal support workers. Click here to download a pdf version of this contract language.

1 Letter of Agreement: FLSA Implementation

2

3 SECTION – WORK WEEK.

4 The regular work week shall consist of a forty (40) hour work week. The work week shall be

5 defined as 12:00am Sunday through 11:59pm Saturday.

6 SECTION – OVERTIME.

7 Retroactive to January 1, 2016 HCWs/PSWs shall be paid at a rate of time and a half (1 ½ ) of

8 her/his hourly wage rate for all hours authorized and paid in excess of forty (40) hours per week.

9 For workers with multiple hourly rates, overtime shall be paid at a rate of time and a half (1 ½) of

10 their weighted hourly average wage.

11 Overtime payments will be processed no later than thirty-six (36) days after a HCW/PSW has

12 properly submitted their voucher and/or timesheet.

13 All retroactive overtime payments back to January 1, 2016 will be issued no later than

14 September 30, 2016.

15 SECTION – NEW HOMECARE AND PERSONAL SUPPORT WORKERS’ HOURS

16 LIMITATION.

17 HCWs/PSWs newly authorized to work on or after June 1, 2016, shall have an hours limitation

18 where hours worked shall not exceed forty (40) hours per week beginning September 1, 2016.

19 Consumer/Employers may be granted exceptions to this hour’s limitation for HCWs/PSWs by

20 DHS/OHA, or designee, due to workforce shortages or to meet other service needs of the

21 consumer. Irrespective of the above language, a HCW/PSW may not work more hours than

22 they are authorized, except in emergency situations to meet the needs of the Consumer as

23 outlined in Article 14 (a).

1

2

3 SECTION – CURRENT HOMECARE AND PERSONAL SUPPORT WORKERS’ HOURS

4 LIMITATION.

5 HCWs/PSWs authorized to work before June 1, 2016 shall have an hour’s limitation as defined

6 below. Consumer/Employers may be granted exceptions to the below hour’s limitations for

7 HCWs/PSWs by DHS/OHA, or designee. The worker’s average paid weekly hours in the

8 months of March, April and May shall be used to determine subsections (a-c).

9 a) All HCWs/PSWs working more than 50 hours per week, will have a 50 hour cap

10 applied when the first consumer’s reassessment or renewal occurs between

11 September 1, 2016 and no later than June 30, 2017. This section shall apply

12 irrespective of starting with a new Consumer/Employer.

13 b) HCWs/PSWs working less than fifty (50) hours, but more than forty (40) hours,

14 per week shall be limited to no more than fifty (50) hours per week. This section

15 shall apply irrespective of starting with a new Consumer/Employer.

16 c) HCWs/PSWs working less than forty (40) hours, per week shall be capped at

17 forty (40) hours per week.

18 d) Live-in workers moved to the hourly program shall be limited to no more than fifty

19 (50) hours per week.

20 e) Irrespective of the above language, a HCW/PSW may not work more hours than

21 authorized, except in emergency situations to meet the needs of the Consumer

22 as outlined in Article 14 (a).

23 f) All hours worked include hourly, travel time, live-in and relief care hours.

24

1

2 Stipend for Required Training

3 If a worker is required to attend a training, by DHS/OHA, and based on the Consumer’s care

4 plan, including but not limited to the Oregon Intervention System (OIS) training, the worker shall

5 receive the OHCC training hourly stipend.

6

7 SECTION – RELIEF CARE

8 a.) Payment to a Relief Worker providing hourly respite shall continue to be paid at the

9 worker’s applicable hourly rate.

10 b.) Effective September 1, 2016, all relief care hours provided in a 24 hour block will be paid

11 at eleven (11) dollars per hour. Relief care providers will be paid at least sixteen (16)

12 hours per day and may receive up to three (3) hours per twenty-four (24) hour period for

13 direct care provided during the consumer’s normal sleep schedule. Relief Providers may

14 be paid for more than nineteen (19) hours a day only in emergency situations. Providers

15 will be paid in fifteen (15) minute increments for services provided during the

16 Consumer/Employer’s normal sleep hours.

17

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Homecare workers reach overtime agreement with state

Since the federal Department of Labor ruled that homecare workers are covered by overtime laws, our bargaining team has been been negotiating with DHS for an implementation that is fair to workers, without putting services to our consumers at risk. We are excited to announce that after seven months of bargaining, we have reached an agreement with the State.

From the beginning, the State proposed to cap hours for homecare providers at 40 hours a week. Because there was a limited amount of money to pay overtime without putting services at risk, our team’s priority was to minimize the impact any hours cap would have on current providers who work more than 40 hours a week. Over the past seven months, thousands of us—workers and consumers alike—have joined together in union to demand that the State bargain a more fair and responsible hours cap.

The good news: our collective action worked! We made significant progress from the State’s original proposal for a 40 hour a week cap and no overtime pay until September. Because of our collective action, workers will receive overtime pay retroactive to January 1, 2016- which means over 32 million dollars going into homecare workers’ pockets!

Settlement Details
Effective Date of Overtime
  • Overtime will be paid retroactive to January 1, 2016 for any hours paid above 40 in a week. This is a huge win, especially since the State originally proposed delaying overtime until September.
  • The retroactive payments will be paid to workers no later than September 30, 2016.
  • These retro payments equal more than 32 million dollars going into workers’ pockets!
Hours limitation for workers currently working more than 40 hours a week (based on average number of hours paid in March, April and May)
  • A 50 hour per week hours limitation starting September 1, 2016. This is a big improvement over the State’s initial proposal of a 40/hr a week cap.
  • The 50 hour limitation will be implemented on a rolling basis (won’t be implemented until the first Consumer’s assessment after 9/1/16).
  • We secured language that allows Consumers to request an exception to this 50 hour limitation.
  • We pushed for and won language that workers in this group can continue to work up to 50 hours a week even if they start with a new Consumer.
  • Hourly, live-in, travel time and relief care hours all count towards the cap.
Hours limitation for: -Workers currently working less than 40 hours a week and -New workers as of June 1, 2016
  • There will be a 40/hour per week cap for:
    • workers currently working less than 40 hours in a week.
    • And any new workers as of June 1
  • Knowing there would need to be flexibility with this new policy, we secured language that allows Consumers to request an exception to this 40-hour per week cap due to workforce shortages or specific needs of a Consumer.
  • Hourly, live-in, travel time and relief care hours all count towards the cap.
24-hour Relief Care
  • We agreed to change the way payment for 24-hour relief care works. Instead of a $175 block payment, 24-hour relief care will be paid at $11/hr for a minimum of 16 hours a day. Workers will also be paid for any sleeptime services provided.  Hourly relief will not change and will continue to be paid at the workers applicable hourly rate.
Other Important Language
  • If a worker has multiple wage rates, overtime will be calculated at 1.5 times the worker’s weighted average rate.
  • Future overtime payments (earned after 9/1/16) will be paid one month in arrears. For instance, overtime earned in the 9/1/16-9/1/15/16 pay period will be issued during the mid-October payroll run (and the 9/16-9/30 overtime will be paid during the early Nov payroll run).
  • Hours worked for multiple Consumers and in multiple programs will all count towards calculating overtime.
  • If a worker is required to attend a training by DHS/OHA due to a Consumer’s care plan (like OIS training) they will now receive the OHCC training hourly stipend.
  • Workers should not work more hours than they are authorized unless in emergency situations to meet the needs of the Consumer. If a worker provides services outside of authorized hours, they must notify the Consumer’s case manager/personal agent within two business days.
  • For the purposes of calculating overtime the workweek will be considered 12:00am Sunday through 11:59pm Saturday.

 

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Homecare Hours Cap Bargaining Update

Our member-elected bargaining team met with the State last Thursday to continue pushing for a fair settlement. We have been fighting for the last six months for a path forward that is the most fair to workers, without putting the overall DHS budget and services at risk.

The good news is that by coming together, and collectively pushing back, we saw significant improvements in the State’s proposals last week. Click here for a side-by-side comparison of the State’s and our Union’s latest proposals.

Before we met with State last week they were proposing:

  • a 45-hour per week cap for all hourly workers, which would result in significant pay cuts for thousands of workers.
  • Delaying any overtime pay until September, but still capping hours retroactive to April. This proposal would have resulted in workers having a reduced number of hours for five months before getting any overtime pay.

Click here for a side-by-side comparison of the State’s and our Union’s latest proposals.

Together, thousands of us have been putting pressure on the State to settle a fair and responsible hours cap by signing a unity petition, sharing our stories and participating in a delegation to DHS Central Office Management. And throughout last week workers and consumers called APD Director Ashley Carson-Cottingham and ODDS Director Lilia Teninty to send the message that a 45-hour per week cap for current workers wasn’t good enough.

Our priority throughout this process has been to mitigate the impact of any hours cap on current Consumers and workers. We have made significant progress from the State’s original proposal for a 40 hour a week cap and no overtime pay until September. Our next bargaining session is scheduled for June 24th where we are going to make one final push for a fair settlement. Stay tuned for more details on how you can help.

Union’s Proposal as of 6/9 State’s Proposal as of 6/9
Effective Date of Overtime Retroactive to January 1, 2016 Retroactive to January 1, 2016. This is big movement from their last proposal of September 1.
Hours cap for workers currently working more than 40 hours a week for a single consumer Common language that the State’s 50/hr per Consumer policy that has been moving since last Fall is not enforced until the Consumer’s next assessment and that folks are allowed up to 50 hours per week; also allows for exceptions Common language that the  State’s 50/hr per Consumer policy that has been moving since last Fall is not enforced until the Consumer’s next assessment and that folks are allowed up to 50 hours per week; also allows for exceptions
Hours cap for workers currently working more than 40 hours a week for multiple consumers Proposed a 60 hour cap starting in September 50 hour cap starting in September.
Hours cap for workers currently working less than 40 hours a week Language that allows for exceptions to a 40-hour per week cap for new workers and workers currently working less than 40 hours a week. Language that allows for exceptions to a 40-hour per week cap for new workers and workers currently working less than 40 hours a week.

 

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Important updates for Personal Support Workers

Important reminders for Personal Support Workers on upcoming payroll changes and Paid Time Off

PSW Payroll Changes

(These changes do not apply to Independent Choices or PC-20s)

As of February 1, 2016 PSWs who submit a paper timesheet for the CDDP/Brokerage to enter must submit it within two business days of the end of the payroll period. Contact your CDDP/Brokerage with any questions on this new policy.

PSWs doing their own time entry into eXPRS will continue to have three business days to submit their signed timesheets to the CDDP/Brokerage for verification.

Click here for a copy of the 2016 PSW Payroll Calendar

PSW Paid Time Off Cash-out Reminder

February is right around the corner, and if you earned Paid Time Off benefits through the Oregon Homecare Workers Benefit Trust last year, so is the first automatic cash out date for those benefits!

In order to receive a cash out of any paid time off benefits under the Trust, you must meet the hours eligibility criteria and you must turn in a completed W-9 form to the Trust Administrative Office. If you do not turn in your W-9 to the Trust Administrative Office by February 1, 2016, you will not receive any paid time off benefits for 2015. Click here now to make sure you don’t miss your opportunity!

If you have worked the required number of eligible hours to earn a PTO benefit through the Oregon Homecare Workers Benefit Trust last year, those benefits are about to be cashed out and closed out. You must complete a return a [W-9 form] in order to be eligible for PTO benefits.

Complete these two steps today:

  1. Complete the W-9 form
  2. Send your completed W-9 form to the Trust Administrative Office

If you have misplaced the W-9 form the Trust sent you, click here to download and complete the form

For the fastest process, fax your completed W-9 along with a cover letter that has: Attn: OHCWT PTO, with your full name and your best phone number to 1-866-459-4623.

To turn in your completed W-9 via mail, send it to

Attn: OHCWT PTO
PO Box 6
Mukilteo, WA 98275

Remember, your form must be received by the Trust Administrative Office no later than February 1, 2016 in order for you to receive a 2015 PTO benefit.

Don’t miss your opportunity, fill out and return your W-9 to the Trust Administrative Office today if you haven’t already.

You can find more information on the Trust’s website or by calling the Trust Administrative Office at 1-844-507-7554, select option 3 and then option 2.

 

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Payroll changes for homecare workers

Important information about changes in the way DHS is processing payroll for homecare workers

These changes will take effect in January 2016, and are summarized below. If you have more questions that are not answered here, please contact the SEIU Local 503 Member Resource Center at 1-877-451-0002 or homecare@seiu503.org.

Change in Pay Dates

The United States Department of Labor (DOL) issued new rules that require the Department of Human Services (DHS) to start paying overtime for any hours worked above 40 hours a week. Overtime payment is expected to begin some time in 2016, stay tuned for more details.

In order to prepare for this change, the state will have to change how our vouchers look. Instead of just collecting the total numbear of hours worked in a pay period, the vouchers will now have to show time in and time out for each shift worked, so overtime can be calculated correctly. This will be a change for workers and also a big change for local offices. DHS payroll clerks will now have to enter the number of hours each person worked per day.

The state will roll in the implementation of the new vouchers over the next few months. Stay tuned for more information on upcoming trainings about how to complete the new voucher.

The new overtime regulations are the driving force behind the changes in how DHS processes payroll for homecare workers and is why the payroll timelines had to be extended. We know change isn’t fun, but this also gave us an opportunity to fight for – and win – our path to $15 during contract negotiations.

Effective 1/1/16, pay periods will be

  • First day of the month – 15th
  • 16th – last day of the month

We will have 3 business days after the end of the pay period to submit timesheets. Paychecks will be issued 8 business days after submission deadline.

Example: January 2016

Work hours completed between January 1 and January 15:

Vouchers are due January 21 (due to weekend and MLK holiday, 1/21 is 3 business days after end of pay period)

Checks will be issued February 2 (8 business days after submission deadline)

See the updated payroll calendar for all voucher due dates and check issue dates in 2016.

January 2016 pay date

The State sent out some recent payroll calendars that have caused a lot of confusion about the January 2016 pay date. As reflected on the updated payroll calendar), December 2015 vouchers/hours will still be processed under the old payroll timelines — two days after submission. This means if you turn your December hours in on January 4th, your voucher will be processed by end of the day on January 6th. The new payroll timelines start with January 2015 vouchers.

Text message reminders

Adjusting to a new system can be hard. If you would like a text message reminder two days before vouchers are due and then again on the deadline, text SEIU503Care to 787753 to get on the list.

Higher wages go into effect January 1

Change is hard, but don’t forget that our new paychecks will be bigger because of the wins we made in our new contract! The base pay will increase to $14/hr starting January 1st for hourly workers. Also starting January 1st, live-in providers will be paid for at least 16 hours a day, up from the current average of 9 a day.

Together, we can continue to win big!

Our most recent union contract increases wages and benefits, advocates for quality consumer services, and strengthens Oregon’s homecare system. Together, we can continue to win improvements.

If you are not already a member, join SEIU Local 503 today!

Become a member of SEIU Local 503 today by filling out the online membership form.

Being a member of SEIU 503 definitely has its benefits! Besides bolstering our fight for better wages, benefits and quality services for all Oregonians, membership also gives us some extra perks and discounts that really add up and make a difference. All members of SEIU Local 503 receive $2,500 in free life insurance, as well as access to travel, entertainment, AT&T Wireless discounts, and much more. If you’re not currently a member, fill out the enclosed form today so you can take advantage of these great benefits! More information about member benefits here.

Without the political power and collective voice we have through our union, our upcoming wage increases would not have been possible. Together, we held lawmakers accountable to us and the services we provide. We need to continue to build our political strength, and we do this through contributing to our union’s political action fund, Citizen Action for Political Education (CAPE). We won wage increases and strengthened Oregon’s homecare system because providers like you invested in our CAPE fund to make sure we have a strong political voice. To win in the future, we’ll need to do more of the same. Make your contribution to CAPE today.

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Homecare workers Fight for $15 and a Union

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2016 Homecare Trust Updates

Exciting changes are underway for the 2016 medical insurance plan year! Here are some of the highlights; please visit www.orhomecaretrust.org/overview/ for more information!

  • Exchange Plan Choice Stays the Same. Trust-eligible participants who qualify for benefits through the Exchanges will continue to have the following Trust approved plan options for Oregon:
    • Participants who reside within the Kaiser service area can choose from either the Kaiser Permanente $1500 Deductible Silver plan or the Oregon Health Co-op $3500 Deductible Simple Silver HSA Broad plan.
    • Participants who reside outside of the Kaiser service area can choose from either the MODA $1550 Deductible Be Prepared Silver plan or the Oregon Health Co-op $3500 Deductible Simple Silver HSA Broad plan.
  • Deductibles, Copayments and Coinsurance. For 2016, the Benefit Convenience Card will continue to be funded with $3,000 per calendar year for Trust-approved plans and Medicare plan eligible expenses incurred in 2016.
  • Medicare Supplemental, Advantage or Drug Plan premiums. For 2016 maximum monthly premium reimbursement amount for Medicare Supplemental, Advantage, or Drug Plan is maintaining a benefit level of up to $41. You will need to resubmit your reimbursement materials to the Trust Administrative Office to continue to receive this benefit in 2016.
  • Medicare Part B premiums. Beginning January 1, 2016, you will not have to resubmit for your Medicare Part B premiums to continue that benefit unless you lose eligibility for the benefit and regain eligibility in a different plan year.
  • Vision Benefits.  In partnership with Ameritas, the vision materials benefit is increasing from $250 every two years to $450 every two years beginning January 1, 2016. There will also be an additional hearing materials benefit and Lasik benefit beginning January 1, 2016.

If you are currently insured through the Marketplace you will want to report your income increase for January 2016! You need to schedule a phone appointment to renew your coverage by December 15, 2015. If you are currently uninsured, you can also schedule an appointment to enroll into medical insurance. There are three ways to schedule your appointment:

  • Online. Visit www.seiu503.org/scheduler (preferred)
  • By email. Email us at acahotline@seiuoregon.org immediately with your best phone number, preferred language and best times of day to reach you!
  • By phone. Contact your Healthcare Enrollment Team at 1-855-437-2694. Because your Healthcare Enrollment Team is currently experiencing a high volume of calls, you will need to leave one message with your name, best phone number, preferred language and wait for a return call.
To be able to complete your appointment, you must review, sign and return the HIPAA Authorization Form and Statement of Understanding.  Fax your HIPAA Authorization Form and Statement of Understanding with a cover sheet containing your name, best phone number and Attn: ACA Healthcare Team to 503-420-8665. You can find these forms, as well as other materials to assist you with your appointment online at https://www.orhomecaretrust.org/2016-enrollment-materials/.

* All benefits listed are only provided to Trust eligible Participants as long as they are eligible. If you have questions as to whether or not you are eligible for these benefits, please contact your Trust office at 1-844-507-7554 Option 3, then Option 2 or via email at OHCWT@bsitpa.com. To learn more about what benefits you may be eligible for, please visit https://orhomecaretrust.org.

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Top Ten List of Advocacy Wins for Oregonians with Developmental Disabilities

  1. Parent provider and guardianship advocacy. Parent providers, organized through our union, pushed ODDS and they responded by coming with a fair process in which guardians could continue to be paid providers. Guardians can now appoint someone else to take on the role of the employer. This appointed individual could be another family member, a family friend, or a trusted community member. The appointed individual will have two responsibilities: signing off on the provider’s timesheets, and attending the Individual Support Plan (ISP) meetings. Guardians will still be able to attend the ISP meetings. This was a turnaround from the initial conflict of interest stance that the state was taking on parent provider and guardian providers.
  2. Natural Supports. Our union advocated for compliance by the state and its service providers to eliminate mandatory natural support as outlined in Medicaid State Plan Community First Choice Option. This means that, family providers are compensated for the assessed needs of loved ones in their care and are no longer expected to work for free because of their familial status.
  3. SB 1542 gave non-Medicaid Oregonians in need of in-home support services access to Home Care Commission Registry. This enabled many Oregonians a more affordable way to find qualified Home Care workers as the state was only recouping administrative cost. Up to this point the choices were between hiring an agency or advertising and hiring on their own.
  4. SB 559 required CDDP to provide Oregonians with developmental disabilities at least three placements options when deciding where to live and receive services. At least two must be from in different settings (e.g. two Adult Foster Homes and a group home) Previously Oregonians with developmental disabilities had little to no choice of where they lived and received services.
  5. SB 5529 Budget notes removed monetary caps on brokerage consumers’ individual service dollars. Consumer needs will be fully funded at the level assessed in the needs assessment tool, with no caps or unmet needs. Consumers will no longer have to make limited funds stretch between support hours, technology, and employment services.
  6. SB 5529 As a result of cap removal, consumers will no longer have to go into crisis services in order to meet their needs.  This meant that consumers would not have a disruption in their familiar environment or existing case management relationship in order to have the needs met.  The process up to this point was that consumers would have to go into a “crisis” bed that at times were in a different location from their current living situation.  In conjunction with moving, a consumer was also be assigned a new “crisis” case manager and relay very personal information to someone new at a time that could be particularly stressful.  
  7. SB 626 Expanded Oregon’s Long Term Care (LTC) Ombudsman Program to include Oregonians with mental illness or developmental disabilities. Many family members, direct service workers, and consumers had expressed frustration that their concerns about resident rights, service quality, disparities in access to service, lack of choice regarding service options, and system development initiatives are not being addressed.
  8. SB 640 mandated that service needs are assessed once every three years or, if a provider requests a reassessment before the three-year period, that a reassessment will be conducted if the provider has documentation that services cannot be provided at the current funding level.  This was an improvement from the 5 year cycle that had been previously in place. Service providers at that time were forced to file an exit notice to force the county to reassess service funding.
  9. Reassessment in the Functional Needs Assessment Tool. Providers, organized through our union, advocated for consumers’ right to receive a reassessment if they believe their needs are not being met. Consumers can now request and are required to receive a reassessment within 45 days from their Personal Agent or Service Coordinator.
  10. Removal of wait list for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities seeking services within the Community First Choice Option delivery system.  Providers, organized through our union, advocated for the elimination of the wait list for individuals waiting for services from Brokerages and CDDPs.  This allows Oregonians with developmental disabilities to get their needs met without being forced to wait for their number to be called for support services.
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